think simple


8
Jul 16

Heroes of simplicity: Seoul’s Ted Chung

OB-JK962_chung0_G_20100801165514

Here’s another hero of simplicity whose story is part of my new book, Think Simple.

One of the reasons I was excited to write another book was that it gave me the opportunity to look at the power of simplicity beyond the world of technology. I had conversations with a fascinating group of business leaders in different industries and countries.

In the process, I found inspiration in places I did not expect. One such place was the credit card business in South Korea.

Ted Chung is Vice Chairman and CEO of Hyundai Card, a financial division of the larger Hyundai Motor Group. He was brought into the company after leading the turnaround of a Hyundai factory in Mexico—and Hyundai Card was in serious need of a turnaround. Projections indicated it was about to lose more than a billion dollars that year.

Ted is not your typical corporate leader. He’s even less typical as a financial company leader, as he came to the job without deep experience in the industry.

But Ted knows a lot about running and inspiring a company, and he is a true believer in the power of simplicity. Continue reading →


6
Jun 16

Heroes of simplicity: Blue Man Group

My new book, Think Simple, will be published tomorrow. While my previous book focused on the power of simplicity as practiced by Steve Jobs and Apple, the new one goes further. I sought out more than 40 practitioners of simplicity in a range of companies around the world. Here’s one of them. Or, actually, three of them…

bmg

In searching for my heroes of simplicity, I hoped to find the most colorful stories. This one had more color than anticipated.

Blue Man Group was founded by Chris Wink, Phil Stanton and Matt Goldman. For those who aren’t familiar, BMG creates entertainment experiences. It’s hard to explain, but amazing to see. The show is all fun—combining music, performance art, electronics, strange instruments, audience participation and general mind-bending.

Blue Man Group started in 1987 as a three-man street act in New York City. Now they have permanent theaters in five U.S. cities and Berlin, and have performed for more than 30 million people around the world. Continue reading →


6
Jun 16

Has Apple lost its simplicity?

Last week, I wrote an article for The Guardian with the above title. It was a question, not a conclusion, and I tried to offer a thoughtful opinion. Sadly, The Guardian chose to give it a click-bait headline that contradicted my point of view. So, for the record, here is the complete article as originally intended.

 Four years ago, I wrote a book about Apple and the power of simplicity.

It was the result of my observation, having worked with Steve Jobs as his ad agency creative director in the Think different years, that Apple’s stellar growth was rooted in Steve’s love of simplicity.

This love—you might call it obsession—could be seen in Apple’s hardware, software, packaging, marketing, retail store design, even the company’s internal organization.

apple-ii-simplicity

Even back in the 70s, Apple was professing its love for simplicity

But that was four years ago.

Though Apple’s customers remain fiercely loyal, the natives are getting restless. A growing number of people are sensing that Tim Cook’s Apple isn’t as simple as Steve Jobs’s Apple. They see complexity in expanding product lines, confusing product names, and the products themselves.

Is this just perception, or is it reality? Has Apple developed a problem with simplicity? Or is it simply maturing as one should expect from a global company?

It’s difficult to be objective because Apple has become the world’s most overanalyzed company. It’s created passionate fans and passionate detractors.

Maybe I can help. My experience with Steve Jobs has led me to admire Apple—but I also believe in tough love. This is a good time to put emotions aside and take a cold, hard look at Apple’s current “state of simplicity.” Continue reading →